International Open Data Hackathon 2011

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David Eaves is calling on everyone to participate in the second International Open Data Hackathon. After last year's success, this time we'll have better tools, bigger data and therefore more fun! (Crossposted from David Eaves' blog)

Last year, with only a month of notice, a small group passionate people announced we'd like to do an international open data hackathon and invited the world to participate.

We were thinking small but fun. Maybe 5 or 6 cities.

We got it wrong.

In the end people from over 75 cities around the world offered to host an event. Better still we definitively heard from people in over 40. It was an exciting day.

Last week, after locating a few of the city organizers email addresses, I asked them if we should do it again. Every one of them came back and said: yes.

So it is official. This time we have 2 months notice. December 3rd will be Open Data Day.

I want to be clear, our goal isn't to be bigger this year. That might be nice if it happens. But maybe we'll only have 6-7 cities. I don't know. What I do want is for people to have fun, to learn, and to engage those who are still wrestling with the opportunities around open data. There is a world of possibilities out there. Can we seize on some of them?

Why?

Great question.

First off. We've got more data. Thanks to more and more enlightened governments in more and more places, there's a greater amount of data to play with. Whether it is Switzerland, Kenya, or Chicago there's never been more data available to use.

Second, we've got better tools. With a number of governments using Socrata there are more API's out there for us to leverage. Scrapperwiki has gotten better and new tools like Buzzdata, TheDataHub and Google's Fusion Tables are emerging every day.

And finally, there is growing interest in making "openess" a core part of how we measure governments. Open data has a role to play in driving this debate. Done right, we could make the first Saturday in December "Open Data Day." A chance to explain, demo and invite to play, the policy makers, citizens, businesses and non-profits who don't yet understand the potential. Let's raise the world's data literacy and have some fun. I can't think of a better way than with another global open data hackathon - an maker's fair like opportunity for people to celebrate open data by creating visualizations, writing up analyses, building apps or doing what ever they want with data.

Of course, like last time, hopefully we can make the world a little better as well. (more on that coming soon)

How?

The basic premises for the event would be simple, relying on 5 basic principles.

1. Together. It can be as big or as small, as long or as short, as you'd like it, but we'll be doing it together on Saturday, December 3rd, 2011.

2. It should be open. Around the world I've seen hackathons filled with different types of people, exchanging ideas, trying out new technologies and starting new projects. Let's be open to new ideas and new people. Chris Thorpe in the UK has done amazing work getting young and diverse group hacking. I love Nat Torkington's words on the subject. Our movement is stronger when it is broader.

3. Anyone can organize a local event. If you are keen help organize one in your city and/or just participate add your name to the relevant city on this wiki page. Where ever possible, try to keep it to one per city, let's build some community and get new people together. Which city or cities you share with is up to you as it how you do it. But let's share.

4. You can work on anything that involves open data. That could be a local or global app, a visualization, proposing a standard for common data sets, scraping data from a government website to make it available for others in buzzdata.

It would be great to have a few projects people can work on around the world - building stuff that is core infrastructure to future projects. That's why I'm hoping someone in each country will create a local version of MySociety's Mapit web service for their country. It will give us one common project, and raise the profile of a great organization and a great project.

We also hope to be working with Random Hacks of Kindness, who've always been so supportive, ideally supplying data that they will need to run their applications.

5. Let's share ideas across cities on the day. Each city's hackathon should do at least one demo, brainstorm, proposal, or anything that it shares in an interactive way with at members of a hackathon in at least one other city. This could be via video stream, skype, by chat... anything but let's get to know one another and share the cool projects or ideas we are hacking on. There are some significant challenges to making this work: timezones, languages, culture, technology... but who cares, we are problem solvers, let's figure out a way to make it work.

Like last year, let's not try to boil the ocean. Let's have a bunch of events, where people care enough to organize them, and try to link them together with a simple short connection/presentation.Above all let's raise some awareness, build something and have some fun.

What next?

1. If you are interested, sign up on the wiki. We'll move to something more substantive once we have the numbers.

2. Reach out and connect with others in your city on the wiki. Start thinking about the logistics. And be inclusive. Someone new shows up, let them help too.

3. Share with me your thoughts. What's got you excited about it? If you love this idea, let me know, and blog/tweet/status update about it. Conversely, tell me what's wrong with any or all of the above. What's got you worried? I want to feel positive about this, but I also want to know how we can make it better.

4. Localization. If there is bandwidth locally, I'd love for people to translate this blog post and repost it locally. (let me know as I'll try cross posting it here, or at least link to it). It is important that this not be an english language only event.

5. If people want a place to chat with other about this, feel free to post comments below. Also the Open Knowledge Foundation's Open Data Day mailing list will be the place where people can share news and help one another out.

Once again, I hope this will sound like fun to a few committed people. Let me know what you think.

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International Open Data Hackathon 2011